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NJGIRL
03-06-2015, 06:51 PM
We are planning on retiring early (in the next 7 years) after my son is out of college. I would like to move to a warmer climate for the winter and Florida is an option.

My question is to anyone who works or has applied to Disney. I would like to get a part time job at either Disney or Universal. I am a book keeper now but after retirement would like to work in one of the retail shop just for a little extra money. How hard is it to get a job in Disney and how much do they pay.

I really don't want to work in food service, transportation, a hotel or even an attraction. I am probably only interested in the retail stores.

Also, my husband is an electrician (but can do just about anything). Does Disney hire directly or contract work out. He will need golf money. lol

tjstrike
03-06-2015, 10:05 PM
I think disney employees start around $9-10 an hour, as far as getting in, I don't know that for sure but I see all kinds of jobs on their site. As for your husband, the maintenance work is contracted out through a local union. (Last time I checked)

missymouseworld
03-07-2015, 08:42 AM
I would like to move to a warmer climate for the winter and Florida is an option.



After the snow this winter in NJ, that sounds like a GREAT idea!

Strmchsr
03-07-2015, 05:38 PM
Rita, the difficulty of getting a job at Disney often depends on how picky you are. If you really want to work there your best bet is to request retail, but be willing to take anything. Then, after you get in and through your probationary period you're able to start looking for other opportunities and applying for those. It generally becomes fairly easy to get into a position you want once you've gotten your foot in the door. And pay does generally start around minimum wage.

As for being an electrician, Disney does hire those directly but usually not part time. There may be some part-timers, but I think all the maintenance guys I've spoken with are full time.

As for a warmer climate, remember the grass is not always greener. During July and August down here I'm begging to go back to the winters of New York I loved so much. The summers here can be as miserably hot as the winters are cold up north.

If you're only looking to be a snowbird, Disney does hire some seasonal workers, but generally those are people who are already established in Disney and decide to move away so only come back for 2-3 weeks at a time.

Figaro
03-07-2015, 05:58 PM
Rita, the difficulty of getting a job at Disney often depends on how picky you are. If you really want to work there your best bet is to request retail, but be willing to take anything. Then, after you get in and through your probationary period you're able to start looking for other opportunities and applying for those. It generally becomes fairly easy to get into a position you want once you've gotten your foot in the door. And pay does generally start around minimum wage.

As for being an electrician, Disney does hire those directly but usually not part time. There may be some part-timers, but I think all the maintenance guys I've spoken with are full time.

As for a warmer climate, remember the grass is not always greener. During July and August down here I'm begging to go back to the winters of New York I loved so much. The summers here can be as miserably hot as the winters are cold up north.

If you're only looking to be a snowbird, Disney does hire some seasonal workers, but generally those are people who are already established in Disney and decide to move away so only come back for 2-3 weeks at a time.


Retail and Food are usually some of the easiest ways to get in. As far as the "probationary" period...Rule used to be you had to be in a role for 6 months before you could request something different, so transferring around isn't too difficult. Pay does tend to be closer to minimum wage, also. As said, summer months do get hot. It's mostly the humidity that does it sometimes, too. Seasonal as mentioned is an option, also. You are only required to work 40 hours a year to maintain employment that way. Seniority though seasonal is close to the bottom, but above CP, etc. :mickey:

NJGIRL
03-07-2015, 09:35 PM
Thanks everyone!

We wouldn't stay in Florida the summer months, but be back in NJ then.I have relatives that moved to Orlando before Disney was built, yes we used to go to Orlando when there was no Disney! Growing up we visited them a lot in the summer and I know that I don't want to be there when it's that hot!

I would be working for a little extra spending money and to keep busy so I'm not too worried about the pay, just curious.

I know that my husband can get a travelers card if they are union workers. That won't be a problem....but I know he won't want full time work again.

I tried to go on the Disney employment web site but I couldn't find any details and we are no where near ready to apply.

Thanks everyone for giving me a clearer picture! :thumbsup:


And Chris...I always thought you were from the South. I didn't know you were from NY!

Strmchsr
03-08-2015, 10:20 AM
And Chris...I always thought you were from the South. I didn't know you were from NY!

My Dad was a USAF chaplain so I grew up all over the world. We spent a few years in Plattsburg, NY up on Lake Champlain. Loved it.

#1donaldfan
03-09-2015, 02:12 PM
Retail and Food are usually some of the easiest ways to get in. As far as the "probationary" period...Rule used to be you had to be in a role for 6 months before you could request something different, so transferring around isn't too difficult. Pay does tend to be closer to minimum wage, also. As said, summer months do get hot. It's mostly the humidity that does it sometimes, too. Seasonal as mentioned is an option, also. You are only required to work 40 hours a year to maintain employment that way. Seniority though seasonal is close to the bottom, but above CP, etc. :mickey:

Seasonal employment has gone up considerably. It used to be 40, but my DD has to have 80 now. She travels down several times a year to get her hours. :thumbsup:

Figaro
03-16-2015, 09:39 AM
Seasonal employment has gone up considerably. It used to be 40, but my DD has to have 80 now. She travels down several times a year to get her hours. :thumbsup:

I stand corrected :thumbsup: Thanks for the tidbit of info! Somewhat not surprised it's gone up, however...

dnickels
03-17-2015, 09:44 AM
Keep in mind too that because you'd be new and hoping to work just seasonally, you'll be at the back of the line not only in locations, but hours. You're not going to get that 9 AM to 4 PM shift, they're going to want you doing the 6 PM to 2 AM shift on weekends and holidays when EMH go late. That's the reason you see so many young people and college program kids working at Disney and relatively few older retirees. Not many people want to work irregular hours or get home from work at 3 in the morning when they're 60+ years old.