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View Full Version : Jury Duty on a tough case. Intense Issues warning



Crow
02-21-2008, 09:12 PM
Just finished serving on a jury. I just need to talk....its over we rendered a verdict on all charges...but it involved a minor & things unimaginable to some...
I just hope that i was able to make a difference.
Do you think it is ok to contact the Asst Da to thank her for prosecuting & to ask if she can convey best wishes to the victim & to keep me updated?
Even though the verdict has been reached Im not sure I can post more about it here.

SBETigg
02-21-2008, 09:39 PM
That's a tough one. I don't know what's appropriate. But I feel for you, Crow. My husband served on a brutal case last year and it put him through the wringer emotionally. Thank you for showing up and doing what you had to do. I'm scheduled for duty soon, too.

RenDuran
02-21-2008, 09:57 PM
I'm always glad to hear when someone does their jury duty....there's too many people that try to weasel out of it. My husband has been called twice in the past two years, (served once, dismissed the other) and you should hear people telling him how to get out of it!

Personally I would find approaching the DA a little strange now that everything is settled.

I hope that you find some peace from what you heard during your jury time. And whatever the minor involved endured, I hope they find peace and healing.

drummerboy
02-21-2008, 10:27 PM
Although I'm an attorney,I've been called for jury duty three times and served on two. (I knew the other parties too well in one civil case and thought they were both crooks, so kept myself off that one by saying I couldn't be impartial.)

Being a part of our justice system, I appreciate that you did serve on a jury. My wife was on a Federal jury not too long ago and it was hard on her too. The jury system is one of the privileges we have in this country thought, so thanks for doing your part to preserve it.

DizneeRX
02-21-2008, 10:30 PM
Good for you with serving jury duty!!

Although your intentions are good, I honestly think it's very inappropriate convey best wishes to the victim. I think you would be violating the victim's right to privacy. The victim wasn't there to tell their story (or have their story told - whatever the case may be) just to have you, as a person, hear it. They were there to present facts about an incident to prosecute someone. This person has a right to tell their story in a secure environment... the courtroom. If you were to go beyond that, it just isn't right. It's not like this person just told you what happened. You were a juror, there's a duty of confidentiality and essentially anonymity to uphold, this even applies as to the victim.

I know you want the best for the person and I know it's hard to not get emotional, but you did your job as an American citizen and member of a lawful society. In doing that, you helped the victim as much as you could and I'm sure the person is quite thankful for it.

With regards to the DA... a win is satisfaction enough.

MsMin
02-22-2008, 12:07 AM
I understand the need to talk about the experience. It's often tough when I come across something so horrific that I feel the need to talk about it but we usually have enough professionals involved to share it with.
I often use some parts of cases or incidents as a form of "teaching" for others but have to be real careful to change things enough that ppl can not id the person or family I am speaking of. I change age, sex, city or what situation I knew the person in etc. but it's easier since we see so many. I understand that in this situation it's tougher b/c it may be more obvious as to who or what case you are speaking of.
Have you tried journaling? I wouldn't put down names etc. but just putting your thoughts down on paper often helps keep those frustrating feelings at bay.. Maybe write a note to the victim but don't send it.
I have one case in particular that if I were to say anything it would be obvious as to the case I was speaking of so I do understand.
Remember you did your duty, you were honest and did the best to your ability and that it admirable.
I agree about letting it go and not trying to contact the assistant DA. You may be careful too about sending anything in the mail that could end up in the wrong hands.

Crow
02-22-2008, 07:37 AM
thanks for the feedback. I guess I did make a difference.
Ive been thinking about it. now back to work for a few days. And I will have to put it out of my mind I guess & get ready for WDW next week.

SBETigg
02-22-2008, 09:14 AM
thanks for the feedback. I guess I did make a difference.
Ive been thinking about it. now back to work for a few days. And I will have to put it out of my mind I guess & get ready for WDW next week.

The timing couldn't be better. What a great way to de-stress. Nothing helps like being in the happy place. Best wishes moving on and have a fantastic time!

Kairi_7378
02-22-2008, 09:25 AM
That's one thing that people don't realize about jury duty... it can be a very emotional experience! I served as an alternate on a jury last year, and I couldn't sleep some nights, thinking about what I had heard during the days' testimony. And everyone at work acted like I was getting a free vacation! I wanted to reach out to the victim, but decided that that could stir up some bad memories for her so I decided to pray for her after the case was over. It made me feel better and who knows, perhaps it helped her to heal. I am glad that you have a trip to WDW to look forward to to relax after your trying few days.

Jeff G
02-22-2008, 09:40 AM
Thanks for doing your duty for better of society! Hopefully some ralaxation and a few :beer: at WDW will help put this behind you.

mrsgaribaldi
02-22-2008, 09:53 AM
Good for you with serving jury duty!!

Although your intentions are good, I honestly think it's very inappropriate convey best wishes to the victim. I think you would be violating the victim's right to privacy. The victim wasn't there to tell their story (or have their story told - whatever the case may be) just to have you, as a person, hear it. They were there to present facts about an incident to prosecute someone. This person has a right to tell their story in a secure environment... the courtroom. If you were to go beyond that, it just isn't right. It's not like this person just told you what happened. You were a juror, there's a duty of confidentiality and essentially anonymity to uphold, this even applies as to the victim.

I know you want the best for the person and I know it's hard to not get emotional, but you did your job as an American citizen and member of a lawful society. In doing that, you helped the victim as much as you could and I'm sure the person is quite thankful for it.

With regards to the DA... a win is satisfaction enough.

I would agree with this if he wanted to contact the victim in person. I got from his post that he wanted to tell the DA and have them pass it on. I say do it. Let's face it, if the DA doesn't think it's appropriate, they won't pass it on. Crow will feel better and won't even know if it didn't go any further. I don't think that asking to be updated is right though. Just my humble opinion.
Now for jury duty, I have been called twice. The first time I was so excited and I even wanted to be sequestered since I hated my job so much. I didn't even see the inside of a courtroom, I was so disappointed. So then again, right when I was eligible over the summer I was called again. This time I was in the courtroom and just disappointed. It was nothing like Law & Order!! I guess I should have known since my ER is nothing like "ER" or "Grey's Anatomy" or any other hospital show. I was even questioned but not picked and sent home again. DH would love to go but has never been called at all. So why am I so lucky??:confused:
Sorry for the ranting, I'm tired:blush:

Cinderelley
02-22-2008, 02:43 PM
I served on a jury last year for a pretty rough case. A couple of weeks afterwards, our DA had a little "debriefing" session with us, so I don't think it would be inappropriate to contact the DA or to convey your best wishes through the DA. As far as updates, I guess it depends on what you wanted to be updated on. It certainly is within your rights to fin dout about sentencing, etc. In fact, here in Phoenix, we have a website where you can pull that information up to see. If you wanted info about the victim, I don't think that would be appropriate. The victims needs to get on with their lives the best they can.

bleukarma
02-22-2008, 02:57 PM
Crow, Im sorry you got such a tough case! Hopefully your WDW trip will help you unwind and take it off your mind some. I think it would be nice to send a you did a great job message to the DA, they probably rarely get follow-up like that, and if they do then it will probably still be appreciated. Its always nice to hear that you did a great job! But as far as the victim goes I would let them move on with their lives and pray that everything works out for the better for them. Now that the trail is over they probably just want to put the past behind them.

I always thought it would be interesting to serve jury duty, but Ive never been called.

Crow
02-22-2008, 07:24 PM
believe me I would have rather been working than having had that happen.
I hope she can go on w her life; it must have been terrible to have to go back to remember those times.
I was in a funk at work today, tried to get in better mood by the end of the day. and Im someone whos always upbeat. believe me I needed a few:beer: after it was over.

DizneyFreak2002
02-22-2008, 11:19 PM
Crow, I wouldn't.... That would and could be a grounds for reversal, jury misconduct....

I was a member of a jury, and jury foreman no less, for a murder trial involving two brothers who allegedly murdered an off duty cop... Won't discuss the case or our verdict, but, it was very stressful... Crow, vent all you want...

jillluvsdisney
02-23-2008, 02:11 PM
I wouldn't contact the DA or the victim either. It just seems inappropriate even though your intentions are well meant.

Stan
02-23-2008, 02:56 PM
I've been on a couple of juries- nothing so extreme but stressful enough to be making decisions that affect others. I've gotten thank you letters from a judge, and I recall being asked a few questions after 1 case (by that same judge I think) about the performance of a couple of brand new prosecutors and public defenders (almost like it had been a bit of a workshop!). So from the system's side I guess it's (sometimes?) OK to intiate contacts with the jurors.

But I'm with the others who've said you should leave it alone. Especially if there was a conviction, our court system seems so sensitive to anything- even things that don't "make sense" to regular folks, that I wouldn't trust it not to allow some (expletive deleted) to get some kind of reversal. Stranger things happen every day.

Plus I agree about the privacy of the victim and the concept of a "sterile courtroom environment", even though such a thing is really impossible.

So I suggest you let this sleeping dog lie.