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View Full Version : Anyone have or have advice on a mac computer???



threeh
04-11-2007, 12:10 PM
I am in no way any type of computer literate. My home PC is apinfully slow and old so I was talking to a friend at work about maybe getting a notebook for myself to do my banking (ok and Intercot:secret: ) and she suggested a Mac. I looked them up and they look decent, any thought?? I was thinking of the Mac mini which uses my allready owned keyboard mouse and monitor.

Thanks to all!!!

DizneyRox
04-11-2007, 12:49 PM
I'll say, that those that Mac users are usually a very loyal bunch and to them a Windows PC is just a door stop. Many folks in the Windows camp think the same thing about a Mac.

I really boils down to what you want to do with the computer.

If you want my take:

If you're looking to just surf the Internet and maybe right a paper here and there, e-mail, simple banking, etc. Either will do, but a Mac is probably overkill. hey tend to be more expensive than a Windows PC, especially in the laptop arena.

If you are a business professional NOT in the graphics field, I would suggest a Windows based PC.

If you are in the graphics field, then a Mac might be your best choice.

I would lean towards a Windows PC from your description.

BrerGnat
04-11-2007, 01:24 PM
If you are not very computer literate, but ALREADY understand how to use Windows, you will have a hard time adjusting to using an Apple computer. The operating system is very different from Windows PC. My sister is a graphic designer and when she switched from PC to Mac, she spend about a MONTH being completely frustrated because she did not know how to do things (and she has a computer science degree!).

Apples are more for people who need very good computers for doing graphics/video based work. Their multimedia programs and functionality are far superior to PC.

However, for the home user, mainly email, internet, word processing, etc., PC's are much more accessible and affordable.

You have to keep in mind that the processing speed of computers these days grows exponentially every 2 or so years. A computer even 4 years old today is considered "ancient" as compared to what is currently on the market.

For this reason alone, I suggest not spending more than $1000 on a computer. We just got a new laptop for DH since he will be going away to school for 5 months and we will be staying home. He needed a computer, so we purchased this one (that I am using right now). It is a Toshiba Satellite A130. It is a very well appointed computer and the total cost with shipping was around $850. It starts at $784 but we upgraded a couple things. They can be customized. Anyway, it is wonderful and I highly recommend it if you are looking into a laptop. Toshiba makes excellent laptops, but they do not make desktop computers for home use.

I would look into Dell if you want a full on desktop. Call them and they will help you configure a computer that has what you need and nothing you don't.

MsMin
04-11-2007, 01:46 PM
I'm going to agree with the above posts -- a Mac is great for graphics. My two girls use macs. My son and I have PC's.
One thing that does frustrate my dd with the mac is that many times the MAC version of something comes out later or doesn't exist, e.g. some of the disney programs. Last year we were doing a grand gathering and the software is not (was not - don't know if they finally updated) compatible with the mac/Apple.
While many Apple users insist it is more user friendly it may be overkill if you are not big into graphics.

2Epcot
04-11-2007, 02:29 PM
I have two computers. I have an older Mac I use just for editing and I have a PC I do just about everything else on. I love both Macs and PCs. My brother is a graphic artist/animator and has been using Macs forever. He has two of them. My PC is only a couple of years old, and I really regret buying it. I'm tired of all the virus protection stuff. When I finally upgrade my editing system to new Mac that will also become my main computer. I don't think I will ever buy another PC.

Lehman Family
04-11-2007, 02:35 PM
I agree with the above posters with the one exception of the Toshiba laptops. We use both Toshiba and Dell where I work (I'm a computer technician). The Toshiba's tend to be slower than the dells that we have (with the same hardware and software configurations) and the support for them has been nothing short of horrible. We can have Dell out her on the next business day 99% of the time. If we need support for Toshiba laptops it usually takes at the very least a week and has actually taken up to a month in some cases just to get someone to come out and replace warrantied hardware. Spending under $1000 would probably depend on how long you want to use the computer. As stated before, it depends on what you will be using it for, but it also depends on how long you're planning on using it before you want to replace it. If you want to keep it for a long period of time you should probably make a few upgrades. If you're just planning on using it until the warranty runs out and then replacing it, I'd go with a cheaper one. I do think that in your case a MAC is overkill, but some people love them. If you have someone that will allow you to play around with a MAC of theirs for a little, I'd say give it a try and see what you think. One last thing, I always suggest paying the extra for a warranty (usually 3 year depending on what's available) because electronic components can stop working pretty much whenever. It's not necessary and you might not need it, but it's always nice to be reassured that if your hard drive blows up that it will be replaced at no cost to you instead of having to decide between a new hard drive or a new computer. Of course my view is from a service standpoint so if you never need to service your computer, it doesn't matter.

TiggerRPh
04-11-2007, 07:40 PM
If you are not very computer literate, but ALREADY understand how to use Windows, you will have a hard time adjusting to using an Apple computer. The operating system is very different from Windows PC. My sister is a graphic designer and when she switched from PC to Mac, she spend about a MONTH being completely frustrated because she did not know how to do things (and she has a computer science degree!).

I just don't understand this at all....and frankly I have to wonder how computer literate this person really is.

Yes, the Apple OS and Windows OS are different, but most people don't have to deal with the OS. Yes, the computer is set up differently and you have to do somethings differently but frankly it's not that hard.

I consider myself fairly computer literate and have used Windows based computers for nearly 20 years and got a Mac Book Pro 2 months ago and it took me all of an hour to get it up and running and had it mostly figured out after a few days.

The problem is that most Windows users are used to doing things in ways that don't seem logical and can't break habits. The Mac OS and how things are configured are so innate and logical it's unbelievable.

My Mac has the same size screen (15.4") as my last laptop, but is lighter, thinner and faster.

I'd say go to a store that sells Macs and take a look and have them show you through using one.

I think you'll like what you see.

Plus, the Mac styling kicks butt...and you won't need to use any anti-virus or spyware software.

Damon18
04-11-2007, 08:06 PM
I was thinking of the Mac mini which uses my allready owned keyboard mouse and monitor.


I have a Mac mini and I think its a great computer. For what you are looking for it might be just the thing. They are much cheaper than the laptops and it doesn't sound like you need anything too complex.
I have had mine for a little over 2 years now and I can honestly say it has never crashed or frozen on me once. And as far as getting to know the new OS it really can't get any easier than a Mac. You'll catch onto it in no time.

Dracula766
04-11-2007, 09:01 PM
Yes I am a Graphic Designer and I can't stand even looking at a PC. I've turned down jobs because they didn't have Apple workstations.:sick:

now that i got that out of the way...

The Mac mini is a good way to go for PC users who want to familiarize themselves with a Mac. Your existing Monitor, keyboard & other peripherals should work fine.

The benefits are simple.
Macs are very easy to use. My son has been using my computers since he was 3 or 4. Of course it will take time to adjust if you are a PC person but it isn't complicated at all.

Mac OSX is also very stable. This means that your computer won't crash 10 times a day for dumb reasons. If there is a problem with an application then only that will quit, everything else remains running. I often have a dozen applications running at once and have no trouble.

VIRUSES? Mac's are immune to most computer viruses. The bad people that make viruses do so with the intention of causing as much damage as possible. The majority of the world is on PCs so that is who viruses are directed towards.

A big complaint is that the programs people want to buy are PC only. This is not true. Microsoft Office and many other business programs are available for Mac OSX. The games may take a little longer to come out though.

Also, if you MUST have Windows, you can run Windows on a mac as a virtual PC.

I would write a lot more but I'm getting hungry and wanna go get dinner :eat:

I'll be happy to answer any questions if i can

:bolt:

sunlyon
04-12-2007, 09:29 AM
Oh, yes, we MAC people are very loyal. Frankly I can't believe PCs still exist! ;)

Macs are VERY easy to use. Most everything is in your pull-down menus or you can load the alias into the dock. There is NO CLUTTER on a Mac. I know it is difficult for PC users to understand, but you don't need to have all your alias files on your desktop. You can see your whole screensaver without the mess!

I say start with the Mac mini. They are a good intro to Mac since you already have the other peripherals. The only real problem I see with a Mac is that a lot of games and other "fun" software are not produced for a Mac or they come out later. However, when they do become available they are usually better programs since the programmer can take advantage of the powerful graphics available. Almost all office-type software is available in both versions.

Once you get a Mac you'll never go back!
:D

threeh
04-12-2007, 02:43 PM
Thanks to evryone for the responses!!! we are moving soon so once we get settled I was going to go look around in the MAC store in Pittsburgh, PA.

Thanks again to all!!!:thumbsup:

mrsHerbie53
04-12-2007, 06:03 PM
Oh, yes, we MAC people are very loyal. Frankly I can't believe PCs still exist! ;)

Once you get a Mac you'll never go back!
:D

I wholeheartedly agree! I switched to an iMac at home 2 1/2 years ago and to a Mac PowerBook at work shortly after that. I will NEVER own another PC. They just work! It is that simple. There is an adaptation period, but that is because of all the stupid "hoops" pcs make you go through. Mac are stable. I have had NO blue screens of death, no intrusions, nothing. Just HAPPINESS! :)

My lease on the one is about up and I will buy it out for $1. I am thinking about giving it to my son and getting a new one for me. But I really don't need to -- it is in PERFECT condition. How may PCs can you say that about?
But don't tell everyone :secret: or we won't be special. :)

caryrae
04-12-2007, 06:32 PM
I started with a Mac computer and now I am on my second windows laptop, nothing wrong with 1st one just had it for like 5 years. I actually like the windows based better. I actually had more problems with my iMac freezing and crashing alot. The Toshiba I have now and the HP I had before I have never had 1 problem with them.

One reason I switched was it was hard to find game software for the Mac without having to go to an Apple store or order online. I can find windows games anywhere Target, Walmart ect. It may be different now I don't know. I do use my laptop for mostly internet, games, photos and music.

One question I do have is, if the Mac's are so much better why has the majority of the world used window's based PC's for so long? Is it cuase the windows computers are just cheaper? I am not dogging Mac's I just have always wondered that. I do notice most movie companys and music companys seem to all use Mac's.

Dixie Springs
04-12-2007, 06:37 PM
I was once a Mac enthusiast, but as soon as Windows caught up, I went their way. Cheaper, more options, bigger world of licensees, etc. Haven't owned a Mac in years, but had a horrible time running DD's recently - probably because I've been away so long! It is a touchy subject with extreme enthusiasts on either side of the fence.

One Mac advantage I have heard is less viruses, but that may be because there is 'less' everything else too - users, software, licensees. Oh, and according to Apple's commercials, Mac is a hip, lovable machine and Windows is an uptight dork with nerd glasses (that metaphor may have been feasible 15 years ago, but isn't today).

So, if this is a vote to help the original poster decide - Count one more for Windows.

Clotho
04-12-2007, 07:43 PM
"If you are not very computer literate, but ALREADY understand how to use Windows, you will have a hard time adjusting to using an Apple computer. The operating system is very different from Windows PC. My sister is a graphic designer and when she switched from PC to Mac, she spend about a MONTH being completely frustrated because she did not know how to do things (and she has a computer science degree!). "


This is so nonsensical to me! Mac OSX is THE most intuitive system I have EVER used in my life, and I have used MANY.

If you have the time, read this little story:

I was a hardcore PC person all my life. I grew up with my father having a PC business, and I knew simple programming when other kids had never even seen a home computer. I was satisfied, and had a great understanding of how things worked with a PC. When things went wonky, whereas other people had to contact customer service, I could usually trouble-shoot it myself. So why did I need anything else?

I also grew up around a lot of Mac-lovers, and I was adamant that PC's were all I needed, and I would leave their almost cultish worship of their Macs to them.

So jump to about two years ago. We came into some inheritance money, and we were each deciding what to do with our portions. He had long wanted a Mac laptop, and was spec'ing one out for himself, and was nudging me to get one for myself. I shook my head and said no way. I had my PC and I was very happy with it. Besides, I really didn't want to have to re-learn some new operating system, and I also didn't want to have to give up any of the games and programs I love so much, since Mac programs are more limited--seems everything is made for a PC, but only some are made for Macs.

He kept nudging me, and insisted that I would NOT regret it if I got one. And that frankly, once I got to play with his, I was going to want one for myself anyway, so to just give in. So somewhat grudgingly, and somewhat with curiosity, I gave in and got myself a 15" Powerbook (he got the 12" to take back adn forth to work).

It was instant conversion. I mean...I cracked that baby open, and it was SOOOOOO intuitive! It was ridiculous how easy it was to make the switch. And how quickly the simplicity and ease-of-use of the Mac made going over to my PC desktop a chore. Every time I sat down, it felt more and more difficult to adjust back to the PC--nothing was intuitive, finding files was harder, and forget about integration between different programs. I was completely spoiled by the seamless drag-and-drop between EVERY program on the Mac, by the use of Spotlight (well I use *********** [<---why can't I say quick silver (one word)?], but the same idea) to find my files without having to click around. I kept trying to use my hot corners to access the different layers of programs I was working with, and then sighing heavily when I remembered I didn't have that on my PC! With my Mac I never had to search for a driver, or try and figure out how to install and uninstall anything (Just drag to program icon to the Program folder to install. Drag it to the Trash if you don't want the program or file and it's done cleanly)...and the list went on and on.

Skip ahead to the end of last year. I joyfully replaced my PC desktop with my iMac 24". I am a complete convert, such that my PC is little more than a file server now. Hubby hasn't officially said "I told you so", but I would be fine if he did because I am so glad he pushed me to make the switch.

And for anyone who says that the issues with programs not being released for the Mac is an issue...no longer. Nevermind that all Macs are now shipping with BootCamp, which is Mac's dual-boot software (where you can reboot your computer in PC mode and run all your PC programs over there), but there is what I use: Parallels.

I completely flipped when I got to use this the first time. No rebooting. In fact, in Coherence mode, you can run your PC programs right next to your Mac programs on the same desktop, and the very same drag-and-drop capabilities continue to work. I can drag a document I am working on over on the PC window right into my Mac Mail and send it off...without any conversion or rebooting or any tooling around at all. If you prefer your familiar PC interface, you can just switch the mode, and the whole desktop turns into Windows XP--look, feel, everything. For ~$70 this program is a steal--I would pay twice that much for this (don't tell them that!).

One final anecdote: hubby's' grandfather is a ripe old 84, and enjoys dabbling with computers, but he has only known PC's his entire life. Hubby's Mom is planning to switch over when she saves up, and wanted to buy Bapa a new computer at the same time, and was hoping she could convince him to make the switch as well--less issues all around, a far more stable system, so she and hubby wouldn't be over there trying to troubleshoot things for him all the time. He wasn't interested. So we brought him over to our house and set up the iMac and walked him through it all, including showing him Parallels to show him how he wouldn't have to sacrifice his PC-centricity if he didn't want to. Literally, he could run in PC mode full time if he wanted to, but would have the benefit of the more stable system. He was completely sold, because the Mac was so intuitive he could learn it in just the 45 minutes we sat down with him to show him how it worked. He said he would probably want Parallels to be ablet o run some old out of print programs, but that the Mac operating system was just great.

So there you have it. Conversion of a hardcore PC-gal. I was not one of those blindly loyal Mac fans. I was instead a PC-lover, and I have seen the error of my ways. ;)

I was actually going to get a Mac Mini, but I wanted to replace my ancient screen, and cut down on the clutter, so the iMac was a very affordable way to do all that in one fell swoop. One fun side-effect is that I use it on the dining room table most of the time, and just pick it up and move it when we want to use the table--it's only 25 pounds total. We sometimes bring it into the bedroom to watch movies (we don't have a TV in there), and have a little remote that comes with it and use Front Row (an included program which allows you to watch slideshows, videos, and movies, listen to music, etc) to cuddle and watch a Netflix.

This got really really long. But it goes to show how strongly I feel about it. It is worth every penny.

Have fun exploring the possibilities of a Mac! I can vouch that my iMac is FAB. :cool:

Clotho
04-12-2007, 07:55 PM
One question I do have is, if the Mac's are so much better why has the majority of the world used window's based PC's for so long? Is it cuase the windows computers are just cheaper? I am not dogging Mac's I just have always wondered that. I do notice most movie companys and music companys seem to all use Mac's.


Well one reason is because of Microsoft's world domination. I don't mean that to sound so "I'm against THE MAN", but living in Seattle, it is a regular household discussion (since 70% of my friends work there *snort*) and very well-known fact that Microsoft has done everything to corner the market on home computers in every way possible...even using illegal measures to do so (hence the hearings). That is why some programs are made for Windows that never get developed for the Mac--Microsoft has the financial and political clout to push for this focus on Windows development. Something that is changing quickly in recent years...I have only had one or two programs TOTAL that I could not find the Apple equivalent of. In those cases, I have Parallels...

Frankly, leaps and bounds in the Mac world is a fairly recent innovation. I would say...well...likely in the last 5-10 years. It is gaining popularity swiftly for a reason, and it ain't just the cheeky marketing. It's because OSX was a humongous leap to the next generation of operating systems, such that Microsoft is scrambling to integrate some of the same bits and bobs into Vista. I suppose that's hard to do when you have 70million different versions of Vista, and nobody seems to know which version they should sell a kidney to afford to purchase...

Mousefever
04-13-2007, 12:49 AM
I'm one of those not very computer literate type folks. I have had a PC for a number of years, but was really fed up with problems that I don't have the skill to fix. So when I decided to get a laptop I called my cousin, who works for HP, to get some advice. She told me that I should look at a MacBook. She mentioned that Macs are great for ease of use, music/video stuff and are not susceptable to most viruses. (I've also heard that Mac customer service is the best around.) My cousin is planning to get her kids Macs when they go to college. She persuaded me. I've had the MacBook for about a month now and I've found it easy to use for the things I've needed. I still use my desktop for some things, but the Mac is growing on me more and more.



:dory: